AI Artificial Intelligence


Wikidata is operated by the Wikimedia Foundation and its fact database is published under a Creative Commons 0 public domain dedication. Funding of Wikidata's initial development was provided by the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence [AI]², the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, and Google, Inc.


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The Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence has established a new startup incubator at its offices in Seattle, recruiting two high-level researchers who will try to develop technologies in the emerging field.

Joining the Institute’s new incubator program are Prismatic co-founder Aria Haghighi and Johns Hopkins University PhD graduate Xuchen Yao.

“We are quickly building an element of the Seattle tech ecosystem, and we’ve identified cutting-edge folks who are startup minded,” said Oren Etzioni, the former University of Washington computer science professor who now leads the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence. “Once we identify super-talented folks like Xuchen and Aria — we give them a lot of freedom to pursue their instincts and initiatives.”

Aria Haghighi

Bankrolled by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen and known as AI2, the Institute was formed 16 months agoto create a new wave of research in the field of artificial intelligence that goes beyond well-known technologies like Siri and Watson.

Among the projects being developed at AI2 is Aristo, described as a “first step towards a machine that contains large amounts of knowledge in machine-computable form that can answer questions, explain those answers, and discuss those answers with users.”

Etzioni calls Haghighi and Yao “anchor tenants” of the incubator, which at this stage is small and is not actively accepting other entrepreneurs.

“Our incubator focuses on the very best technical talent in AI whose work dovetails with the research at AI2,” said Etzioni, adding that there’s “excellent potential for synergy with the technologies” being developed at AI2.

Xuchen Yao

Yao, a former intern at Google and Paul Allen’s Vulcan, is developing a technology known as KITT.ai, which among other things is designed to turn natural language into computer codes with potential applications in home automation and the Internet of Things.

Haghighi, who has relocated to Seattle, spent three years building San Francisco-based news discovery service Prismatic. In March,TechCrunch reported that Microsoft was interested in buying the company, which had raised about $15 million in venture capital. Haghighi left Prismatic in 2013, joining Apple where he worked on the company’s recently launched Apple Watch.

His LinkedIn bio simply says: “Collaborating with the awesome team at AI2, while I tinker on ideas for a new venture.”

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Digital personal assistants today can help you send messages, place phone calls, schedule meetings or find answers from the Internet. But there's evidence that all the major tech giants are investing heavily in artificial intelligence to try and make digital assistants do a whole lot more helpful.

At least that is what Raj Singh, the founder and CEO of Menlo Park, Calif.-based Tempo AI, is seeing as he works to build a smart calendar that automatically manages all aspects of your work and personal life.

Tempo AI’s Co-founder and CEO Raj Singh

During a recent visit to Seattle, Singh explained to me just how fast the sector was evolving.

Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Amazon are all actively acquiring talent and technology to advance the personal assistance space beyond what Singh calls the “participatory” nature of it today, to become “anticipatory.”

Here’s just a small taste for the big moves that are being made:

Artificial intelligence is a broad term that covers a number of technologies, including speech recognition, image recognition and natural language processing.

Singh got his start in the category as an entrepreneur in residence at SRI International, the nonprofit research lab that is famous for spinning off what eventually became Apple’s Siri. In December 2012, Singh founded Tempo AI using some of the research lab’s technology and launched the calendar app early last year. The 16-employee company has raised $12.5 million in capital from Qualcomm Ventures, Sierra Ventures, Relay Ventures and others.

He said Apple’s Siri is a “first-generation assistant,” but in the future, you won’t have to ask the assistant for anything — it will anticipate what you need, more similar to what Google is doing with Google Now. “Why do you even have to ask? Google Now is anticipating and is pushing you the right notification or piece of information,” he said.

In order to pull that off, Singh says you need the data. There’s hundreds of sources to pull from, but only a few can determine intent. Google has your search history, so if you searched for driving directions, it may push you traffic information. But another source of valuable data is purchase history. Companies, like American Express or Amazon, are good sources for that, he said.

At Tempo AI, context comes from your calendar. The calendar knows that you are going on a work trip in June and to Cancun in July. “When you look at your calendar, it’s a good indicator of where you spend your time, and what’s important to you,” he said. “It’s the only app on the phone that can tell your future.”

The Tempo calendar, which is available on iPhone for free, pulls in data from around 30 data sources, including Foursquare, Yelp, Dropbox, Facebook, Google+, Klout, Flickr and LinkedIn. Within the calendar, it will give you more information about the person you are meeting with; provide driving directions and parking instructions, and post your flight status. It will also dial you into conference calls without the hassle of memorizing passcodes.

From there, Singh says they have lots of different ways to go with the app. He said imagine your calendar recommending people you should meet based on other people who are meeting the same people you are. Tempo is also learning interesting information, like which Starbucks will be the most popular next week based on appointments people have made in the future.

While artificial intelligence is a fancy name for it, Singh said it is the craft of bringing together a lot of data sources in a meaningful way: “People use a lot of different tools, and they are scattered across the cloud,” he said. “We are trying to help them be better prepared for their day.”


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Paul Allen's team of AI experts just nailed the SATs - with a robot - GeekWire
The Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence says it has built a machine that can solve geometry questions from the SAT about as well as an average American 11th-grade student. It's a bigger feat for a computer than you might imagine, and represents a major breakthrough in AI research by the Allen Institute, founded by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen.
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The Paul G. Allen Family Foundationtoday awarded $5.7 million to seven researchers in the artificial intelligence field as part of the most recent Allen Distinguished Investigator (ADI) Program grant.

The researchers, who are working on machine reading, diagram interpretation and reasoning, and spatial and temporal reasoning, hail from four universities around the globe — four of them work at the University of Washington.

“The Allen Distinguished Investigator program has become a platform for scientists and researchers to push the boundaries on the conventional and test the limits of how we think about our existence and the world as we know it,” Dune Ives, co-manager of The Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, said in a statement. “We are only beginning to grasp how deep intelligence works. We hope these grants serve as a valuable catalyst for one day making artificial intelligence a reality.”

[Related: The next battleground for Amazon, Microsoft, Facebook and Google: Artificial Intelligence]

The ADI program started in 2010 and this marks the first commitment to researchers in the artificial intelligence field. The focus on AI topics for 2014 is related to the vision of the new Allen Institute for AI, a multi-million dollar effort created by Allen and led by CEO Oren Etzioni that could have huge implications for the region’s tech industry and, more importantly, society as a whole. Etzioni, a former UW computer science professor and veteran entrepreneur, began work at the institute in September 2013.

However, the ADI Program is a distinct from the new Allen Institute for AI and is fully funded and operated by Allen’s foundation.

Here are the recipients, with descriptions from the foundation:

Devi Parikh, Virginia Tech

The vast majority of human interaction with the world is guided by common sense. We use common sense to understand objects in our visual world – such as birds flying and balls moving after being kicked. How do we impart this common sense to machines? Machines today cannot learn common sense directly from the visual world because they cannot accurately perform detailed visual recognition in images and video. In this project, Parikh proposes to simplify the visual world for machines by leveraging abstract scenes to teach machines common sense.

Maneesh Agrawala, University of California and Jeffrey Heer, University of Washington

For hundreds of years, humans have communicated through visualizations. While the world has changed, we continue to communicate complex ideas and tell stories through visuals. Today, charts and graphs are ubiquitous forms of graphics, appearing in scientific papers, textbooks, reports, news articles and webpages. While people can easily interpret data from charts and graphs, machines do not have the same ability. Agrawala and Heer will develop computational models for interpreting these visualizations and diagrams. Once machines are better able to “read” these diagrams, they can extract useful data and relationships to drive improved information applications.

Sebastian Riedel, University College London

Machines have two ways to store knowledge and reason with it. The first is logic – using symbols and rules, and the second is vectors – sequences of real numbers. Both logic and vectors have benefits and limitations. Logic is very expressive, and a good tool to prove statements. Vectors are highly scalable. Riedel will investigate an approach where machines convert symbolic knowledge, read from text and other sources, into vector form, and then approximate the behavior of logic through algebraic operations. Ultimately, this approach will enable machines to pass high-school science exams or perform automatic fact checking.

Ali Farhadi, University of Washington and Hannaneh Hajishirzi, University of Washington

Farhadi and Hajishirzi’s project seeks to teach computers to interpret diagrams the same way children are taught in school. Diagram understanding is an essential skill for children since textbooks and exam questions use diagrams to convey important information that is otherwise difficult to convey in text. Children gradually learn to interpret diagrams and extend their knowledge and reasoning skills as they proceed to higher grades. For computers, diagram interpretation is an essential element in automatically understanding textbooks and answering science questions. The cornerstone of this project is its Spoon Feed Learning framework (SPEL), which marries principles of child education and machine learning. SPEL gradually learns diagrammatic and relevant real-world knowledge from textbooks (starting from pre-school) and uses what it’s learned at each grade to learn and collect new knowledge in the next, more complex grade. SPEL takes advantage of coupling automatic visual identification, textual alignment, and reasoning across different levels of complexity.

Luke Zettlemoyer, University of Washington

The vast majority of knowledge and information we as humans have accumulated is in text form. Computers currently are not able to figure out how to translate that data into action. Zettlemoyer is building a new class of semantic parsing algorithms for the extraction of scientific knowledge in STEM domains, such as biology and chemistry. This knowledge will support the design of next-generation, automated question-answering (QA) systems. Whereas existing QA systems, including IBM’s Watson system for Jeopardy, have been very successful, they are typically limited to factual question answering. In contrast, Zettlemoyer work aims to, in the long term, enable a machine to automatically read any text book, extract all of the knowledge it contains, and then use this information to pass a college-level exam on the subject matter.

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The next battleground for Amazon, Microsoft, Facebook and Google: Artificial Intelligence - GeekWire
Digital personal assistants today can help you send messages, place phone calls, schedule meetings or find answers from the Internet. But there's evidence that all the major tech giants are investing heavily in artificial intelligence to try and make digital assistants do a whole lot more helpful.


 how fast the sector was evolving.

Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Amazon are all actively acquiring talent and technology to advance the personal assistance space beyond what Singh calls the “participatory” nature of it today, to become “anticipatory.”

Here’s just a small taste for the big moves that are being made:

Artificial intelligence is a broad term that covers a number of technologies, including speech recognition, image recognition, and natural language processing.


While artificial intelligence is a fancy name for it, Singh said it is the craft of bringing together a lot of data sources in a meaningful way: “People use a lot of different tools, and they are scattered across the cloud,” he said. “We are trying to help them be better prepared for their day.”








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Paul Allen's Artificial Intelligence Institute launches startup incubator with top minds in AI - GeekWire
The Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence has established a new startup incubator at its offices in Seattle, recruiting two high-level researchers who will try to develop technologies in the emerging field. Joining the Institute's new incubator program are Prismatic co-founder Aria Haghighi and Johns Hopkins University PhD graduate Xuchen Yao.
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Artificial Intelligence Data Mining


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  • are a number of competitions and prizes to promote research in artificialintelligence. The David E. Rumelhart prize is an annual award for making a
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Cognitive Reasoning Platform, Cognitive Computing and Big Data
We live in a world immersed in data. It emanates from our smartphones. It resonates from devices. It's created each time an email is sent, a database is updated or a part is shipped. It's Big Data, but it's often too big and too unstructured for organizations and enterprises to use.
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artificial intelligence - GeekWire
Stories and news about artificial intelligence from GeekWire
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Advances in Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining
Usama M. Fayyad, Gregory Piatetsky-Shapiro, Padhraic Smyth, Ramasamy Uthurusamy. (01 February 1996). { Advances in Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining brings together the latest research -- in statistics, databases, machine learning, and artificial intelligence -- that are part of the exciting and rapidly growing field of Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining.
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The Best Artificial Intelligence Movies
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A list of the best artificial intelligence movies ever made, ranked by movie fans with film trailers when available. This artificial intelligence movie list is ordered ...
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Paul Allen’s Artificial Intelligence Institute launches startup incubator with top minds in AI
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By 
ROBERT MCMILLAN
Oct. 6, 2015 12:01 a.m. ET

International Business Machines Corp. has formed a new business unit to capitalize on the recent groundswell in artificial intelligence.

The new Cognitive Business Solutions group will be run by Stephen Pratt, previously an executive in the consulting practice at Indian outsourcer Infosys. The new division’s 2,000 employees will advise companies in how to take advantage of IBM’s Watson artificial-intelligence software.

IBM Chief Executive Virginia Rometty is expected to announce the group on Tuesday at the Gartner Symposium, a gathering of information technology executives, in Orlando, Fla.

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Introduced in 2011, Watson excels at analyzing vast quantities of information to uncover relationships that humans might miss. It has assisted oncologists at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, contributed to a recipe book, and bested champions of television’s “Jeopardy” game show.

IBM believes it could serve as the core of a new generation of ultrasmart digital assistants in data-heavy industries such as medicine, financial management and oil-and-gas exploration.

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“We see that that is going mainstream,” said Bridget van Kralingen, senior vice president of IBM Global Business Services in a telephone interview. “It’s very, very early days, but we can see it.”

IBM has bet $1 billion on the technology and has high expectations for its growth. The company counts Watson as part of its $17 billion analytics business, but it won’t specify Watson’s portion of that total. It has set a revenue target of $1 billion annually by 2018, The Wall Street Journal previously reported, though the path to profit hasn’t been clear.

“It’s not huge yet,” said David Schubmehl, an analyst with research firm International Data Corp. “It’s not doing hundreds of millions of dollars, but it is significant.”

IBM collects a percentage of revenue from developers who base their programs on its Watson Developer Cloud service. More than 350 partners use the service, IBM said in a blog post last month, to extract useful information from large quantities of data.

But the company sees a significant opportunity in professional services as less technical companies adapt the technology to their unique problems. The Cognitive Business Solutions group will help such customers tailor the software to their business needs, for instance, helping technical support personnel answer questions or analyzing Twitter messages to reveal fashion trends.

The Cognitive Business Solutions group will also advise customers on data-intensive topics such as business analytics, security and the Internet of things, IBM said.

Amazon.com Inc., Apple Inc., Facebook Inc. and Google Inc. have taken advantage of recent advances in artificial intelligence to provide virtual assistants and to improve their voice- and image-recognition capabilities.

As companies with less technological expertise aim to put these techniques to use, they will turn to IBM and Watson, Ms. Kralingen said.

“We believe as this capability gets stronger—and we’re seeing it—it will become a basis for organizations to compete,” she said.

Write to Robert McMillan at Robert.Mcmillan@wsj.com

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There are 11 comments.
Scott Senft5 days ago

"Introduced in 2011, Watson excels at analyzing vast quantities of information to uncover relationships that humans might miss."

Isn't that just number crunching? Why is it being called "artificial intelligence?"

Furthermore, if a company hacked another company's data and then asked Watson to analyze the hacked data, would Watson resist on ethical grounds?

Marc Schneiderman5 days ago

It is a boon for the entire AI/Cognitive Computing community that IBM has invested a billion dollars into their new business. They have single handedly created a new market segment, and promoted an awareness for the technology within all Fortune 500 companies. The real beneficiaries are startups with more innovative software that can accomplish intelligent tasks that IBM's product can only dream of. In the end, it won't be about who was first to market, or who pumped the most money into advertising, it will be about who builds the smartest machines...

Gil Russell5 days ago

Interesting that IBM retains the "Cat Bird Seat" advantage in AI developments using Watson. They'll have an inside seat early on to write checks for those that have long term promise - somewhat akin to farming a field of useful dreams...,

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IBM's New Unit Bets on Boom in Artificial Intelligence
Division will advise companies on using IBM's Watson artificial-intelligence software International Business Machines Corp. has formed a new business unit to capitalize on the recent groundswell in artificial intelligence. The new Cognitive Business Solutions group will be run by Stephen Pratt, previously an executive in the consulting practice at Indian outsourcer Infosys.
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Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence
The Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence (abbreviated AI2) is a research institute funded by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen to achieve scientific breakthroughs by constructing AI systems with reasoning, learning and reading capabilities. Oren Etzioni was appointed by Paul Allen in September 2013 to direct the research at the institute.
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The Key Components of Enterra® The Enterra Enterprise Cognitive System™ - Enterra Solutions
The Enterra Enterprise Cognitive System™ (ECS) was built to meet the demands of a data-rich world, where information is vast. ... Continued
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